Seasons in the Kalahari Desert

Seasons in the Kalahari Desert are mainly extremely hot summer days between September and April with mild evenings and cold winters between May and August with frosty nights and mild days. Spring and autumn are short to non-existent. August and September are regarded as our windy months. Wind speeds easily reach 50 km/hour.

Ecological Area

Being a sensitive ecological area the extreme heat and a formidable absence of moisture are the most testing odds. The vast southern Kalahari is a region of sandy soil, camel thorn trees and low rainfall (250mm - 300mm per year). Rain is unpredictable in the desert, but if you are fortunate enough to experience a thunderstorm you will be astounded!

A remarkable array of life forms is sustained during the rainy season. Bird and insect life is abundant and diverse. Tortoises and leguaans come out of hibernation and snakes thrive on the plentiful field mice. Scorpions are especially active on warm, windy evenings.

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Ecological Area
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Ecological Area

Being a sensitive ecological area the extreme heat and a formidable absence of moisture are the most testing odds. The vast southern Kalahari is a region of sandy soil, camel thorn trees and low rainfall (250mm - 300mm per year). Rain is unpredictable in the desert, but if you are fortunate enough to experience a thunderstorm you will be astounded!

A remarkable array of life forms is sustained during the rainy season. Bird and insect life is abundant and diverse. Tortoises and leguaans come out of hibernation and snakes thrive on the plentiful field mice. Scorpions are especially active on warm, windy evenings.

During the rainy season the usually dormant land comes alive with green pastures and an array of flowering ground covers and the yellow flowers of the thorny tribulus terrestris (duwweltjies).

By winters end, browsers such as dykers and steenbok are in poor condition due to a lack of forage, bushes are bare and no new plants have sprouted. Many of the bird species have spent their entire days searching for enough food to sustain them through the bitterly cold winter nights.

After just a little rain, leaf buds sprout and the comatose land turns a splendid green. Once the Drongo “mikstertbyevanger” pipes its two note “rain song” and the Bustard “ Korhaan” mock dive to the ground , thunder crashes and the true rains come at last.

During the rainy season, January through to March, lightning strikes frequently cause fires which burn fiercely in the camel thorn trees. It can take decades for the trees and small animals they harbour to recover. Even a few drops of rain could mean survival to plants and animals alike.

Within days, after the rain, scores of insects appear, most having spent the winter months underground or camouflaged in trees and bushes. Butterflies, moths, beetles, scorpions and many other insects offer an ample food source to birds, mongoose, meerkats, pangolin and bat eared foxes.

The huge nests the sociable weaver are remarkable and can weigh up to 1000Kg (2200 pounds). They provide a comfortable home to up to 300 paired birds. The area is also rich in raptors. More than 50 raptor species, of which 35 are resident, have been recorded. The most common are the pale Chanting Goshawk and Greater Kestrel.

Listen for the ever-present cicada (sonbesie) whose ceaseless, high-pitched call fills the summer air.

For the springbok and Oryx the birthing season begins and within a few weeks the ‘swart haak’ bushes are in flower and the Bushman grasses are green and juicy and offer a generous supply of food. The continuance of the next generation is assured.

Magnificent Sunrise and Sunsets

Every day boasts magnificent sunrise and sunsets and is awe inspiring for photographers.
Magnificent Sunrise and Sunsets

Diamond Skies

The Kalahari is well known for its diamond skies and Genesis 1 vers 16 – 18 comes to mind when stargazing:
He also made the stars. God set them in the expanse of the sky to give light on the earth, to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good.

The Kalahari and its people

The Kalahari and its people are humble and helpful. We know that we depend on Yeshua in all aspects of our life and live extremely close to the land. We are only supervisors of the land and do our utmost not to interfere or change nature.
The Kalahari and its people
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